Electricity and Magnetism (Phys 350)

James Madison University

Spring 2001

 

Instructor: Dr. Kevin Giovanetti Office: Miller 113

Office hours: Monday 10:15-12:00,

Wednesday 10:15-12:00,

Friday 1:30-3:00

 

Text: Introduction to Electrodynamics, third edition by David J. Griffiths

Class Schedule: M,W,F 9:05 - 9:55

Course Description

Maxwell's equations lay the groundwork for a complete description of electricity and magnetism as a classical field theory. To improve our understanding of these equations we will explore special cases, for example electrostatics and magnetostatics. We will examine applications of the theory. And we will introduce models for material to help us solve many body problems. Most of the material covered can be found in the required text. I would like to cover at least the first 9 chapters of the book. Students may suggest topics for study.

Grades: Weekly quiz 10%

Homework 20%

3 Tests 45%

Final 25%

The following percentage grades will assure you of the corresponding letter grades (although these standards may be relaxed if necessary).

A(90-100) B(80-89) C(70-79) D(60-69)

Homework

There will be a homework assignment from each chapter. Students may work in groups, use any available material, get help from any professor or colleague. If the solution to a problem is largely not the student's work then please provide a note at the beginning of the problem indicating how the solution was obtained. Solutions will be presented in class so if you hand in a solution to a problem you should be able to solve the problem at the blackboard.

Quizzes

Each week there will be a quiz. You should read the weekly web page. This will provide the details for the week's quiz. The quizzes are to be done independently and should not be discussed with anyone accept the instructor.

Tests

There will be three tests scheduled through the semester and a comprehensive final. The format of the tests will discussed during the semester but the general rule is that students able to work end of the chapter problems should do well on tests.